Can Your Therapist Tell Your Parents You Do Drugs?

Can your therapist tell your parents you do drugs? This is a question that many people are asking these days. Therapists are required to report any illegal activity that they become aware of to the proper authorities. If you are doing drugs and seeing a therapist, it is important to be aware of this fact and take steps to protect yourself. In this article, we will discuss the implications of drug use and therapy, and what you can do to keep your secrets safe.

Every year, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) sponsors a national survey on drug use and mental health. The latest report, from 2016, includes data from over 135,000 people aged 12 or older.

Among other things, the survey asked participants whether their therapist or counselor had ever told their parents or guardians that they were using drugs. Less than 1% of respondents said that this had happened to them. In other words, it’s extremely rare for therapists to break confidentiality and tell parents about their clients’ drug use.

Can Your Therapist Tell Your Parents You Do Drugs?

Can Your Therapist Tell Your Parents You Do Drugs

However, there are some exceptions.

There are a few circumstances in which therapists may be legally required to break confidentiality and tell someone else about their clients’ drug use. For example, therapists are required to report child abuse or neglect. In some states, they’re also required to report threats of violence.

Exceptions To Confidentiality

If a client is under 18, there may be other circumstances in which the therapist is legally required to tell the parents about the client’s drug use. For example, in some states, therapists are required to get parental consent before treating a minor for substance abuse. In other states, therapists may be allowed to provide treatment without parental consent if they believe it’s in the best interest of the child.

It’s important to remember that even if the therapist isn’t legally required to tell the parents about the client’s drug use, the client may still choose to disclose this information to the parents. The decision to tell the parents about the client’s drug use is ultimately up to the client, not the therapist.

If you’re a minor and you’re concerned about your parents finding out about your drug use, you may want to consider talking to a lawyer or another trusted adult about your options. You may also want to look into getting treatment from a substance abuse counselor who specializes in working with minors.

It’s important to remember that even if the law protects your confidentiality, there are still some situations where your therapist may be legally required to break confidentiality. For example, if your therapist believes that you’re in danger of harming yourself or someone else, they may need to take steps to ensure your safety or the safety of others.

If you’re concerned about your confidentiality being violated, it’s important to talk to your therapist about your concerns. You should also be sure to ask about their policies on confidentiality before you start therapy. That way, you’ll know what to expect going into therapy and you can make an informed decision about whether or not it’s right for you.

It Depends On The State You Live In

If you’re a minor, your therapist may be legally obligated to tell your parents if they believe you’re in danger. If you’re an adult, your therapist can only share information with your parents if you give them permission to do so. Your therapist may also recommend drug counseling or therapy to help you deal with your addiction.

In general, therapists are required to keep your information confidential. However, there are some exceptions to this rule. For example, if your therapist believes that you are in danger of harming yourself or others, they may be legally obligated to tell your parents or another responsible adult.

Additionally, if you’re under the age of 18, your therapist may be required to tell your parents about your drug use if they believe it’s in your best interests. If you’re concerned about what your therapist may or may not tell your parents, it’s important to have a conversation with them about confidentiality before you start therapy. This will help ensure that you’re both on the same page about what can and cannot be shared.

Final Verdict!

While it may be legal for therapists to break confidentiality in certain cases, they are ethically obligated to weigh the pros and cons of doing so before taking any action. In most cases, it is better for both the therapist and the patient to maintain confidentiality.

If you are concerned can your therapist tell your parents you do drugs, talk to them about your concerns, and ask what their policy is on breaking confidentiality? Hopefully, this article has helped you understand a little more about how therapy works and why therapists keep the information confidential.

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